Realsociology

For committed sociology, agains neoliberalism

Studying Sociology at University

Posted by Realsociology on June 11, 2012

Been a while since I posted so I thought I’d post up this document

Studying Sociology at University

What do you study at University? 

Sociology at university is very different to ‘A level’ Sociology. There is some overlap in terms of basic content but this is minor. As a general rule, most Sociology departments will offer the ‘core modules’ in Sociological Theory, Sociological Methods, Modernity and Post-Modernity, and Globalisation, but besides these, courses will vary depending on the particular specialisms of lecturers in each department. Besides the above, some of the other topics you could end up studying include –

  • Ethnicity, race and racism
  • Gender
  • Marriage, family and interpersonal relationships
  • Media
  • Migration and citizenship
  • Globalisation
  • Friendship
  • Popular culture
  • Political participation
  • Religion
  • The Environment

 

In addition, many departments will offer degrees in related subjects such as:

  • Social Policy
  • Social Work
  • Criminology
  • Anthropology

Where to study

A good website for more information about studying Sociology at University is the British Sociological Association. This has a leaflet you can download and a hub page that contains links to most of the 80 odd universities that offer Sociology and related subjects.

To be blunt, for pretty much any Humanities or Social Science degree you need to be looking at the top 20 universities or you will probably end up unemployed afterwards.

League Tables – Top 20

CUG Rank

University Name

Student Satisfaction

Student Satisfaction
A guide to how satisfied students are with the quality of teaching they receive.

Click here to read more

Entry Standards*

Entry Standards
The average UCAS tariff score of new students under 21 years of age entering the University.

Click here to read more

Research Assessment

Research Assessment
The average quality of the research undertaken in the University.

Click here to read more

Graduate Prospects

Graduate Prospects
A guide to the employability of graduates on completion of their courses at the University.

Click here to read more

Overall Score

Overall Score
The total score calculated by our independent and trusted methodology.

Click here to read more

2013

2012

1 1 Cambridge 4.3   560   2.65   78.0   100.0
2 5 Bath 4.1   383   3.10   68.0   93.9
3 3 Durham 4.1   408   2.65   70.0   93.3
4 2 London School of Economics 3.9   415   2.40   78.0   93.3
5 6 Surrey 4.1   374   2.75   72.0   93.1
6 4 Warwick 4.0   420   2.70   62.0   92.2
7 31 Glasgow 4.1   425   2.25   60.0   90.8
8 14 Exeter 4.1   407   2.70   52.0   90.5
9 16 Bristol 4.1   410   2.40   56.0   90.2
10 13 Sheffield 4.0   367   2.80   56.0   89.8
11 7 Lancaster 4.0   359   2.80   56.0   89.7
12 20 Leeds 4.0   359   2.95   52.0   89.4
13 10 Sussex 4.0   373   2.55   58.0   89.4
14 11 York 4.0   372   2.85   48.0   88.9
15 21 Keele 4.0   323   2.75   58.0   88.9
16 28 Nottingham 4.0   354   2.50   58.0   88.9
17 33 Aberdeen 4.1   372   2.60   50.0   88.8
18 29 Manchester 3.9   384   2.85   48.0   88.7
19 8 Edinburgh 3.7   413   2.75   48.0   88.6
20 18 Kent 3.9   301   2.95   58.0   88.6

And the bottom 7**

84 84 Northampton 4.1   251       30.0   77.3
85 82 Liverpool John Moores 3.8   279       30.0   77.1
86 72 Glamorgan 3.9   259       32.0   77.1
87 80 Buckinghamshire New 3.8   226           77.0
88 83 Bradford 4.1   199       36.0   76.9
89 79 Anglia Ruskin 4.2   225       28.0   76.5

 

*Average UCAS points – one A grade = 120 points, so 3 As = 360

**These don’t do research, hence there’s no research score!

 

Career ‘Prospects’ – Sociology

A range of different types of employers are likely to recruit sociology graduates. Typical employers include: local and central government; industry; commerce; the NHS; education authorities; further and higher education institutions; and charitable, counselling and voluntary organisations.

Jobs directly related to Sociology

  • Social researcher
  • Counsellor
  • Community development worker
  • Advice worker
  • Further education lecturer

Jobs where a sociology degree would be useful

  • Probation officer
  • Social worker
  • Charity fundraiser
  • Housing manager/officer
  • Primary school teacher or Secondary school teacher

A 2010 HESA survey of 2009 graduates indicates that six months after graduation, 60% of sociology graduates were in employment in the UK or overseas with a further 8% combining work and further study. Of those entering employment, graduates entered a wide variety of jobs.

  • 15% went into social and welfare professions
  • 8% went into public and private sector management.
  • 20% entered occupations not categorised, which could include those working in not-for-profit organisations, project-based work.
  • 14% went into clerical and secretarial positions
  • 24% went into retail, catering and bar work

So to put it bluntly, of those students who graduated with a Sociology degree in 2009 2/3rds of them had a job 6 months later and about 1/3rd of those had a ‘real’ (professional) job that actually requires a degree. Overall this means that 1/3rd of Sociology graduates end up with a ‘proper job’ 6 months after graduating.

Of course, 3 years on, you now have less chance of getting a job and will be £30 000 in debt by the time you graduate too.

 

One Response to “Studying Sociology at University”

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